Archive for the ‘Police Training’ Category

Teaching new officers difficult history

May 22, 2019

San Jose police recruits recently took a course on “Policing in the Current Social and Political Climate” during their academy training, as reported here. The course reviewed controversial contemporary incidents but also examined how, “historically, police officers have been used as instruments of government discrimination, tasked with enforcing shameful policies such as the Japanese internment and Jim Crow laws.” The chief emphasized that national and even world events affect how people view the police locally — “No one reads the city on the badge, you just see the badge. We have to understand why certain segments do not trust us. I hope this scratches the surface of that.”

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Analysis of officer-involved shootings in Phoenix

April 21, 2019

This report by the National Police Foundation provides analysis of officer-involved shootings in Phoenix, which doubled in 2018 over the average for the past 9 years. Information was gathered from the community and from police records, and comparisons were made over time and with other big cities and Arizona cities. One factor in Phoenix was that assaults on officers increased, and more OIS incidents involved subjects armed with weapons, including guns. Another was that both police and community members pointed to lack of trust, leading to several recommendations aimed at transparency, accountability, and relationship building.

Details on NZ apprehension

March 18, 2019

This article provides information on the apprehension of the Christchurch, New Zealand mosque attacker. Two officers from an outlying area, who happened to be in the city for a training session, went operational, spotted the fleeing vehicle, made the decision to ram it, and took the shooter into custody. The officers have not been identified by name, but have been praised by the police commissioner and others. Their sergeant commented, “I was surprised how calm and collected they were.”

Tech solutions

March 8, 2019

Two articles out today illustrate potential benefits from modern technology. One describes a mobile app that enables police officers handling a mental health incident to “video chat a physician, therapist or case worker to evaluate the patient at the scene and direct them to a clinic or mental hospital instead of the ER” — pilot testing found a 22% reduction in ER and jail visits saving an average of $847 per call, as reported here. The other describes a test of augmented/virtual reality in disaster response training for EMS personnel — “People who trained on the digital model were 45% more accurate and nearly 30% faster … than those who only received traditional classroom training,” as reported here.

Shootings by NYPD continue downward trend

March 7, 2019

Police-involved shootings by NYPD officers have decreased 96% since 1972, dropping from 994 in that year to 35 in 2018, as reported here. More restrictive deadly force policies adopted in the 1970s had an early impact, while the sharp decline in violent crime since the 1990s has contributed. More recently, officials say enhanced training deserves credit — officers are “put through varying scenarios to prepare them for eventualities when responding to a crisis,” the agency “reviews every shooting incident and passes on findings to instructors at the academy,” and “We address any tactical training issues almost immediately.”

Focus on wellness in Stockton

February 23, 2019

This article describes Stockton, California PD’s wellness network aimed at helping officers deal with stress and trauma. The award-winning initiative includes a significant orientation for new recruits and proactive measures when officers encounter difficult situations in the field. The police department endured layoffs earlier in the decade while the city went through bankruptcy, adding to the burdens facing officers in a violent, high-crime environment. So far, worker’s compensation claims are down as are citizen complaints.

Resilience training

February 8, 2019

This new COPS Office publication describes resilience training being tested in the Milwaukee Police Department. Initial results indicate some positive early-career effects on new officers who get the training in the academy, but no significant impact on mid-career officers who get it later as in-service training. Final results are pending but will include “development of a model to guide effective delivery of resilience training at the academy and … validation of the effectiveness of this training for recruits.”

49 recommendations for Sacramento

January 31, 2019

Following a fatal officer-involved shooting last year, Sacramento PD asked the state attorney general for an outside review of policies and practices. That review has been completed with 49 recommendations, as reported here, covering use of force policies, reporting, training, and investigation, along with complaint procedures, community engagement, and transparency. The full report is available here. In support of the recommendations, the police chief said “The Sacramento Police Department is not interested in being ‘good enough’,” while the mayor promised the city would become a leader in law enforcement, saying “We’re not going to try to huddle in the middle of the pack.”

Police & sex workers

January 9, 2019

This article summarizes a study of 250 street-based female sex workers in Baltimore. More than half had experienced some form of client violence in the last 3 months. In regard to contacts with police, “Excluding arrest, 92 percent had experienced at least one patrol/enforcement activity, and 78 percent had experienced at least one abusive encounter in their lifetime.” Frequent police interactions were more common for those who were also daily drug abusers. The study recommends developing police training specific to interactions with sex workers and establishing a liaison within each police agency.

Police shootings high in Phoenix

January 7, 2019

Phoenix PD had 38 officer-involved shootings in 2018 as of late October, with 19 fatalities. Per population, that rate was 10 times higher than Philadelphia’s, 5 times higher than Chicago’s, and more than 3 times higher than LA’s, as reported here. Activists blame the police while the officers’ union blames violent crime and suspect non-compliance. Both sides are so sure they know the reasons behind the high numbers that they criticized the city for funding an independent study, due to be completed this month.