Archive for the ‘What Works’ Category

“Secured by Design” yields 87% property crime reduction

September 29, 2017

A study by Police Scotland has found that 3,000 “secured by design” (SBD) residences had 1/7th the number of burglaries and thefts over a 10-year period versus comparable residences, according to this article. Information about the UK police SBD initiative is available here.

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Power naps on the night shift

September 16, 2017

This brief video reports a study from the Netherlands on whether “power naps” (maximum 20 minutes) can help police remain alert on the over-night shift. Results indicated that police felt more alert and were 50% less likely to say they had “nodded off” while driving home after work.

Pros and cons of data-driven predictions

September 9, 2017

This article provides a balanced look at the use of data and algorithms to make predictions in criminal justice, including policing. It shows how decision making accuracy can be improved but also explains that it ultimately comes down to questions of values and fairness that can’t be settled by science.

Study: Workshops reduce domestic abuse

August 16, 2017

This article summarizes an experimental study of low-harm domestic abuse first offenders in Hampshire, UK. Men who attended 10 hours of small-group discussions were 35% less likely to reoffend and caused 27% less harm over a 12-month period than those in the control group who merely received conditional cautions. Officials hope to replicate the study in several other UK forces.

Speed camera effectiveness

August 11, 2017

This web page summarizes a recent systematic review of the impact of speed cameras, with links to the full study and advice for implementation. The review of 51 studies across 15 countries found, on average, a 52% reduction of vehicles exceeding the speed limit and a 19% reduction in collisions, with benefits exceeding costs by at least a 3:1 ratio.

POP Guide on focused deterrence

August 9, 2017

The Center for Problem-Oriented Policing has published a guidebook on focused deterrence of high-risk individuals, available here. A full listing of the POP Center’s 99 problem, response, and tool guides is found here.

Interpreters needed

June 24, 2017

This blog post from the UK expresses the skepticism of front-line officers regarding evidence-based policing and the current push to infuse a stronger academic orientation in police development and promotion schemes. Attending a conference, the constable notes “On more than one occasion, the other delegates I sat with – all serving officers – turned to look at one another with one of two expressions … bewilderment [or] incredulity.”

Inconsistent lineups in Minnesota

June 13, 2017

This article describes several cases of flawed photo lineups in Minnesota, a state that pioneered improved eyewitness identification procedures over a decade ago. A 2016 survey found that 60% of the state’s law enforcement agencies lack written policies on the subject. Despite evidence to the contrary, most chiefs believe they are “up to snuff” and prosecutors say “they shouldn’t be dictating investigative processes to police.”

NIJ LEADS Scholars taking applications

June 2, 2017
The National Institute of Justice has a LEADS Scholars program that offers support for sworn mid-career law enforcement personnel with a passion for research and evidence-based policing. The program, started in 2014, is described here.  Applications are now open for the “Class of 2017” — closing June 30. Instructions are posted here.

Designing out crime

February 1, 2017

This article reports an award to a UK company for developing a process of “infusing thousands of microdots into metal sheets ‘marking’ them with a unique identifying code” intended to reduce theft of roofing and building material. The “secured by design” crime prevention program, started in 1989, uses standards and tests nominated and approved by the police to determine which products and systems receive recognition.