Archive for the ‘World Policing’ Category

Use of force reporting

December 2, 2017

New Zealand Police released a very thorough report and analysis of “tactical options” used during 2016, available here. There was no use of force in 99.9% of 3.5 million public interactions and in over 99% of “offender proceedings.” Tasers were the 4th most commonly used tactical option, after empty hand, handcuffs/restraints, and OC spray. Only 15% of Taser incidents involved discharges — the remainder were solely presentation or “laser painting.” Subject injuries occurred in 18% of use of force incidents, officer injuries in 11%. No subjects were shot by police.

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Clever recruiting video

November 27, 2017

Police agencies in the U.S. and elsewhere are getting more and more innovative with their recruiting practices. Here’s a clever video from the New Zealand Police — click the “watch now” button. The same video is here on Facebook.

Swedes find amazing COP in Elgin

November 4, 2017

This article reports a Swedish delegation’s visit to Elgin, Illinois to study community policing. The agency credits its resident officer program, its neighborhood officer program, “its school resource officers, its summer programs and gang interventions in the schools, and its social worker and senior liaison programs” for a 60% crime drop since 1991. The delegation’s leader said of the visit, “This wasn’t great. This was amazing.”

Science of interrogation

October 29, 2017

This article provides an in-depth discussion of the psychology underlying effective interrogation. A study of over 1,000 hours of taped interrogations of terrorists confirmed that the key is rapport and projecting a genuine interest in what the suspect has to say, not trying to establish dominance or using confrontational techniques. Specialist training in the UK is now based on this research and well established methods from clinical psychology.

“Secured by Design” yields 87% property crime reduction

September 29, 2017

A study by Police Scotland has found that 3,000 “secured by design” (SBD) residences had 1/7th the number of burglaries and thefts over a 10-year period versus comparable residences, according to this article. Information about the UK police SBD initiative is available here.

Power naps on the night shift

September 16, 2017

This brief video reports a study from the Netherlands on whether “power naps” (maximum 20 minutes) can help police remain alert on the over-night shift. Results indicated that police felt more alert and were 50% less likely to say they had “nodded off” while driving home after work.

Digital community policing

September 4, 2017

This column reports a UK study of policing, social media, and big data. Among its conclusions: “Communications policing is the new community policing, and should be treated as such, to reflect how more and more of social life has a digital component” and “Too much attention nationally has focused upon purchasing increasingly sophisticated ‘big data’ technologies and not enough upon developing the skills of analysts and users within police organisations.”

Study: Workshops reduce domestic abuse

August 16, 2017

This article summarizes an experimental study of low-harm domestic abuse first offenders in Hampshire, UK. Men who attended 10 hours of small-group discussions were 35% less likely to reoffend and caused 27% less harm over a 12-month period than those in the control group who merely received conditional cautions. Officials hope to replicate the study in several other UK forces.

POP conference October 2-4

August 15, 2017

The 2017 Problem-Oriented Policing Conference will be held October 2-4 in Houston, Texas. The preliminary program is available here, and registration for the conference can be completed here. Goldstein award finalists making presentations are police agencies from Cincinnati, Eureka (CA), Houston, Lancashire (UK), Durham (UK), and Victoria (Canada).

Speed camera effectiveness

August 11, 2017

This web page summarizes a recent systematic review of the impact of speed cameras, with links to the full study and advice for implementation. The review of 51 studies across 15 countries found, on average, a 52% reduction of vehicles exceeding the speed limit and a 19% reduction in collisions, with benefits exceeding costs by at least a 3:1 ratio.