Posts Tagged ‘Florida’

CIT success

August 14, 2017

This article describes the impact of Crisis Intervention Team Training (CIT) in South Florida, where arrests and shootings of people in mental health crisis have plummeted in Miami and Miami-Dade County. Authorities have been able to close a jail and funding for a new comprehensive treatment center has been approved. A spin-off effect has been more officers seeking mental health advice and treatment themselves.

Fired and reinstated

August 7, 2017

This article summarizes data from 37 large agencies, finding that 1,881 officers were fired for misconduct since 2006 but over 450 were reinstated after appeals. “In many cases, the underlying misconduct was undisputed, but arbitrators often concluded that the firings were unjustified because departments had been too harsh, missed deadlines, lacked sufficient evidence or failed to interview witnesses.” Chiefs express frustration whereas union officials argue that officers’ rights must be protected.

Just another day on the job

July 28, 2017

Officer Alfredo Vargas in Boynton Beach, Florida, dispatched to a report of an alligator on a resident’s porch, used a lasso, his jacket, and his bare hands to capture the animal,  transport it in his patrol car, and release it into a canal. In recognition of his effective and humane action, the department will assign him to all future gator calls, according to this article.

Managing overconvergence

June 10, 2017

According to this article, a draft review has found command and control lacking in the police response to the Fort Lauderdale airport shooting last January. Over 2,000 officers responded to the scene in an uncoordinated response, an example of “overconvergence” also seen following the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing and several other subsequent incidents.

Lessons learned from mass shootings

May 4, 2017

This article reviews the 2015 San Bernardino and 2016 Orlando mass shootings and subsequent police responses, along with lessons learned. It notes that “In both instances, patrol and traffic officers, investigators, and command personnel—not tactical teams—were the first law enforcement personnel to arrive on scene” and considers whether current active shooter protocols need to be adapted to fit terrorist, IED, and suicide-bomber scenarios.

Taser … Axon

April 25, 2017

This article provides details on Taser’s re-branding as Axon, emphasizing data services over equipment. Its offer of free body-worn cameras for one year has been compared to a free facial tattoo (hard to undo) while others see a visionary business model mimicking Microsoft and Apple. Meanwhile several cities have criticized the company for strong-arm tactics and competitors have filed legal actions.

Analysis of police shootings in Florida

April 8, 2017

This article analyzes 827 police shootings in Florida from 2009 through 2014, over half of which were fatal. About one-fifth of the people shot by police were unarmed and those were disproportionately black. Detailed descriptions of several cases illustrate the confusing, tragic, and stressful circumstances in which many incidents occur.

Making the transition from soldier to cop

March 31, 2017

This article highlights challenges faced by officers and their departments when transitioning from combat to civilian policing. National data are elusive but the rate of psychological issues, including PTSD and suicide, seems higher among returning soldiers. In addition, veterans’ preference in police hiring often interferes with efforts to increase the number of women and minority officers.

Protest monitoring via social media

March 27, 2017

This article discusses police use of social media feeds, facial recognition, and other methods of surveillance to monitor protests in Jacksonville, Florida. It raises the classic public order versus freedom of speech issue, with a modern technology twist.

Risk/reward in SWAT no-knock entries

March 18, 2017

This in-depth 2-part series, located here and here, examines the practice of no-knock dynamic entries by SWAT teams. National data are not systematically collected, but nearly 100 deaths are known to have occurred in such raids since 2010, including at least 13 police officers. The vast majority of raids are drug cases, leading some police and legal experts to question whether the rewards justify the risks.