Posts Tagged ‘Georgia’

Adopt-a-cop

June 11, 2018

This article describes the Adopt-a-Cop program in Brookhaven, Georgia in which officers can sign up to be paired with a local Catholic family that prays for their safety. The sergeant who implemented the program wasn’t sure that many officers would be interested, but it has become popular and some have established strong relationships with their “adopted” families. Nationally (and internationally) there are 70 chapters of the program first started in Michigan in 1998.

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Where killings go unsolved

June 7, 2018

This article analyzes over 50,000 homicides in U.S. cities, mapping neighborhoods with higher and lower clearance rates. There are variations between cities but also within, with fewer murders solved in low-income minority neighborhoods. Factors seem to include the challenge presented by drug- and gang-related cases, reluctant witnesses, lack of trust in police, and the resources devoted to homicide investigation.

Looking for strategic

May 7, 2018

Here’s an interesting long-read about a former CIA case officer now working as a police officer in Savannah, Georgia. His former life took him to Afghanistan, Iraq, and Jordan in pursuit of Al Qaeda leaders but he came to doubt that much was being accomplished. Back home in Savannah he says “We have to stop treating people like we’re in Fallujah.”

Competition in recruiting

April 22, 2018

This article reports continuing recruitment challenges facing police agencies due to the strong economy, retirement of baby-boomers, and recent negative narratives about policing. One result is more competition between agencies for the best recruits and lateral hires, including bonuses for successful applicants and for current officers who refer them. Average police salaries have been raised 15% since 2010 to make them more attractive. Larger agencies continue to offer substantially higher salaries than smaller ones.

Bad sheriffs

April 3, 2018

The U.S. has about 3,000 sheriffs, an office that goes back to colonial days and preceded the creation of police departments. This article reports numerous recent scandals, embarrassments, and shortcomings in sheriff’s offices around the country and discusses why they persist despite being an elected office that voters should be able to hold accountable.

Black and blue

December 27, 2017

Here are four stories about black police officers working to balance black and blue in the post-Ferguson era: a veteran sergeant in Atlanta (The Shooting Instructor); an outspoken woman sergeant in San Francisco (The Truth Teller); a just-retired patrol officer/rapper in Akron (The Man on the Street); and a young patrol officer in Pittsburgh (The Bridge Builder).

Recognition well deserved

November 22, 2017

This article reports the NYPD naming its police academy library in honor of Benjamin Ward, the city’s first African American police commissioner, appointed to that position in 1984. This article reports Prince William County, Virginia naming a new police station after Charlie Deane, their chief from 1988-2012 who led them through contentious immigration issues. This article reports Lou Dekmar, chief in Lagrange, Georgia and current IACP President, honored at the Kennedy Center in DC by the Anti-Defamation League as “a bridge builder for racial reconciliation in the south.”

Transparency or public relations?

October 26, 2017

This article reviews police practices in releasing body cam video, noting a tendency to promote positive stories while refusing to provide video in situations where actions might have been improper. This pattern risks hurting police legitimacy if the public comes to believe that officials are cherry-picking what to release rather than truly honoring transparency.

IACP launches trust-building initiative

October 25, 2017

This article reports several initiatives of new IACP president Lou Dekmar, including trust building and improved responses to at-risk aging persons. The trust-building effort is supported by a $1 million grant from basketball legend Michael Jordan. Dekmar will receive a hero award from the Anti-Defamation League next Monday at the Kennedy Center for his acknowledgement and apology for his agency’s complicity in a 1940 lynching.

Taser deaths

August 22, 2017

This article begins a series from Reuters on deaths associated with conducted-energy devices (Tasers). The company cites a total of 24 deaths resulting from Taser use since 1983, all due to falls or electrical fires. Examining autopsy findings, though, the news agency identified 153 cases (out of 1,000+ fatalities) citing the stun gun as a cause or contributing factor. The first installment highlights several deaths involving persons who were in mental health or other medical distress.