Posts Tagged ‘Louisiana’

Best states for a police career

May 10, 2017

Here’s another of those lists. It ranks the states (and DC) based on 20 criteria in 3 general categories: opportunity & competition for police jobs, police hazards & protections, and quality of life. The best state for a police career is North Dakota, followed by Connecticut and New York. The worst is Louisiana, followed by Arkansas and Alaska.

Risk/reward in SWAT no-knock entries

March 18, 2017

This in-depth 2-part series, located here and here, examines the practice of no-knock dynamic entries by SWAT teams. National data are not systematically collected, but nearly 100 deaths are known to have occurred in such raids since 2010, including at least 13 police officers. The vast majority of raids are drug cases, leading some police and legal experts to question whether the rewards justify the risks.

Taking unsolved murders seriously

February 9, 2017

This article describes work done by a former journalist to compile and analyze data on unsolved murders throughout the U.S. — well over 200,000 since 1980. Police departments initially ignored his data and alerts about cases possibly linked to serial killers, but have recently started to take notice.

EPIC moments in New Orleans

November 20, 2016

This issue of PERF’s newsletter¬†describes the EPIC initiative — Ethical Policing is Courageous — in New Orleans. The program is designed to encourage and enable officers to step in when another officer seems about to lose his temper or otherwise misbehave in a stressful encounter. The logic is for officers to help each other prevent career-threatening mistakes. Also called peer-intervention, the approach is based on research examining what distinguishes passive bystanders from active bystanders.

Voters in several cities enhance civilian oversight

November 12, 2016

Voters in Denver, New Orleans, Honolulu, Miami, and San Francisco approved measures strengthening civilian oversight of police last Tuesday, according to this article, while a new civilian police commission was created in Oakland. Given predictions that DOJ civil rights enforcement will be significantly scaled back under the Trump administration, the locus of police accountability seems likely to shift even more toward the local level during the next few years.

Reform pressure through insurance

October 14, 2016

This article discusses the role that liability insurance plays in encouraging police reform. While big cities are often self-insured, smaller jurisdictions need risk protection at a reasonable cost, giving insurance providers significant leverage. Some police departments have been eliminated when insurance was canceled and many others have upgraded policies, training, and personnel practices in order to maintain affordable coverage.

Ambush killings of police

October 11, 2016

Premeditated ambush incidents are not the most common circumstances of police line-of-duty deaths, but they have increased in 2016. This article reviews several of the most tragic cases since 2009. Ambush killers have included “white survivalists, black militants, people who identify with the anti-government ‘sovereign citizen’ movement, hard-core criminals who have clashed with law enforcement for much their lives, and a variety of apparently suicidal people who wanted to depart with notoriety.”

Just catch the killers

September 8, 2016

The upturn in homicides and shootings in several US cities in the last 1-2 years has some officials citing deep social and economic issues, but in this column one former mayor argues for putting a higher priority on solving these violent crimes — something that happens less frequently today than 10-20 years ago but which is readily fixable and would instill more confidence in the police and criminal justice system.

Open data in NOLA

September 2, 2016

Transparency through open data, promoted by the White House, is becoming more common. This article reports that New Orleans PD has joined the initiative with daily updates on use of force incidents.

NOLA reforms

August 29, 2016

This column by the mayor of New Orleans outlines numerous reform measures that have been implemented by the police department under a federal consent decree. The changes are aimed at increasing transparency, accountability, and professionalism in an agency long known for corruption and other scandals. One initiative is aimed at training officers to intervene proactively when they see another officer on the verge of exercising bad judgment especially when stress or fatigue set in.