Posts Tagged ‘Louisiana’

Improving line-up procedures

July 16, 2018

This article reviews suggested modifications to police line-up procedures designed to reduce mistaken identifications by witnesses, which account for 29% of post-conviction exonerations. Better procedures have been well known for 20+ years and have been endorsed by professional organizations, but not all departments have adopted them. Louisiana recently enacted statewide requirements, with proposals also pending in California, Iowa, and New Mexico.

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National standards for SROs

May 31, 2018

This article reports on proposed legislation in Congress that would establish national training standards for school resource officers. A few states have adopted specific training mandates for SROs but most have not. The proposals would also begin national data collection on SROs and develop a set of best practices.

Best & worst states to be a cop

May 9, 2018

This article from WalletHub assesses 25 different factors to rate the 50 states plus DC on the desirability of police employment. Criteria include cost of living, salaries, crime rate, and public image. The top 3 are North Dakota, New York, and Connecticut. The bottom 3 are Arkansas, Louisiana, and Idaho. Click the “Ask the Experts” link for a variety of perspectives — the comments from William Vizzard are short and to the point.

Crime prevention improvement districts

April 26, 2018

This article reports growing popularity of “crime prevention and improvement districts” in Baton Rouge and some other cities. Residential neighborhoods, mostly affluent with low crime, agree to an extra tax to pay for overtime patrols and other services. At the same time in Baton Rouge, city-wide tax increases for public safety have failed to win support. The result seems to be “concierge policing,” increasingly uneven police protection favoring those who can most afford it.

World’s most murderous cities

April 5, 2018

This article and map identify the world’s 50 deadliest cities in 2016. There is certainly a pattern — 43 are in Latin America and the Caribbean, 4 in the mainland U.S. (St. Louis, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Detroit), and 3 in South Africa. Cities in Mexico, Brazil, and Venezuela occupy the top 12 (worst) rankings.

Bad sheriffs

April 3, 2018

The U.S. has about 3,000 sheriffs, an office that goes back to colonial days and preceded the creation of police departments. This article reports numerous recent scandals, embarrassments, and shortcomings in sheriff’s offices around the country and discusses why they persist despite being an elected office that voters should be able to hold accountable.

Gun death rates

March 26, 2018

This column compares the 50 states on gun death rates, noting that nationally, over half are suicides while 37% are homicides. Alaska, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Oklahoma have the highest gun death rates, all at least 5 times higher than Massachusetts, which has the lowest rate. Other states with the lowest rates are New York, Hawaii, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.

Getting oversight right

January 24, 2018

This article discusses the pros and cons of various alternatives for achieving police accountability, such as civilian review, police auditors, and special commissions. The public tends to want an independent process but the oversight systems don’t always succeed and they risk diluting the chief or sheriff’s responsibility for discipline. Chicago is cited as one place currently trying several options at once.

Fired NOPD officers hired by other agencies

December 23, 2017

This article reports numerous cases of officers fired by New Orleans being hired by other law enforcement agencies. Records indicate that over the last 10 years NOPD “has fired or otherwise pushed out at least 248 officers … 53 have been hired by other police departments.” Louisiana has a state-level process to remove an officer’s certification, but it has to be initiated at the local level. In the last decade, no officers have been decertified for misconduct.

Progress in New Orleans

August 8, 2017

New Orleans signed a U.S. Department of Justice consent decree in 2013, requiring reforms overseen by a federal judge. Monitoring was extended for 3 years this week with an expectation that it will cease in 2020 if full compliance is achieved in 2018 and then sustained, according to this article. The order cites “significant improvement in almost every area of the consent decree, including policies, training, supervision, custodial interrogations, sexual assault and domestic violence investigations, uses of force, use of force reporting and use of force investigations.”