Posts Tagged ‘Michigan’

Volunteers in Michigan

May 23, 2019

Many law enforcement agencies use volunteers to relieve officers of routine duties or complete tasks that otherwise wouldn’t get done. This article reports on the all-volunteer 13-member Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (Michigan) dive team, which is seeking a few more divers who love ice-cold water. The Grand Rapids PD uses volunteers for “duties unrelated to crime, such as abandoned vehicle tagging, parking violation enforcement, graffiti reporting, vacation house checks and senior resident visits” and is hoping to double its 16-member volunteer program, according to this article.

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Victim tracking of rape kits

April 9, 2019

An increasing number of states have laws establishing rape kit tracking systems, as reported here. At least 17 states now have such laws, with 5 others pending this year. A key feature of the systems, besides helping officials track cases and reduce backlogs, is empowering victims to monitor the status of evidence collected from them. Advocates argue this “provides a degree of transparency and accountability that, until now, had been notoriously absent from sexual-assault cases.”

Murder clearance rates have actually improved — with one big exception

January 26, 2019

This article analyzes city clearance rates for murders and shootings. One key finding is a drop from 65% to 42% since the 1980s in the clearance rate for black and Hispanic victims killed by guns — aside from this category, murder clearance rates have actually improved. Also, non-firearm homicides, which are more likely to yield DNA and other suspect evidence, are solved at higher rates regardless of victim characteristics. Solve rates for non-fatal shootings vary widely but tend to be well below those for murder, at least in part due to overwhelming caseloads.

Long-term drop in solving rape cases

December 28, 2018

This article reviews the national clearance rate for rape, which has dropped from 62% in 1964 to 32% in 2017. Some of the decline is probably due to increased reporting by victims and more complete recording by police. Also, the FBI definition was expanded in 2013 and, most recently, #MeToo has caused a surge in reporting, straining investigative staff in many agencies. DNA and other forensic impovements should help solve cases, but many still boil down to he-said/she-said over the question of consent.

Reducing car-bicycle crashes

November 20, 2018

This article reports early results from a NHTSA traffic safety initiative in Grand Rapids, Michigan. The city has adopted a 5-foot rule for cars passing bicycles, has 83% compliance according to radar devices attached to bikes, and has had a 30% decrease in collisions. The main emphasis is on educating drivers — police have made 146 stops but issued only 3 citations. Knoxville, Tennessee is currently doing a similar study using a 3-foot rule.

Michigan lacks standards for volunteer police

October 25, 2018

This article reports that there are about 3,000 armed reserve officers and deputies serving agencies throughout Michigan. Some departments impose hiring and training requirements but the state has thus far failed to establish minimum standards, despite legislation authorizing its POST to do so. Nationally, California and Nevada are among states with established standards for volunteer officers, but others haven’t acted.

Tracking public sentiment

September 30, 2018

More police departments are beginning to measure public sentiment (trust and confidence) on a regular basis, thanks to enhanced survey techniques that use texting, smartphones, and other cheap and convenient methods. This article reports from Grand Rapids, Michigan where the PD has starting tracking sentiment on a monthly basis. So far the results have been favorable and steady, although the temptation to react to small fluctuations may be hard to resist.

Looking back at the Boston miracle

September 28, 2018

Here’s an informative video that details the original Operation Ceasefire in Boston that helped reduce homicides by 80%. The approach that was developed involved police, probation, clergy, social services, and prosecution. David Kennedy observes that it’s actually easy to implement, but difficult to sustain. According to one pastor, “The miracle was not that the crime rate went down, but that adults figured out how to collaborate in the interests of young people.”

Vacant lots & abandoned buildings

August 24, 2018

This article reports efforts in various cities to reduce crime by focusing on places, especially vacant lots and abandoned buildings. The approach follows the same logic as broken windows theory, but emphasizes improving the physical environment rather than police action. A Philadelphia experiment resulted in a 39% reduction in gun violence in and around remediated abandoned buildings and a small decrease for fixed-up vacant lots, with no evidence of displacement and impacts lasting 1-4 years.

Data-driven policing for public trust

July 16, 2018

Most of the focus of data-driven and evidence-based policing has been on the goal of reducing crime. This article reports efforts in New York and several other PDs to collect real-time data on public sentiment toward police. Using short pop-up surveys on smartphones and other modern techniques, geo-based responses from thousands of people can be collected at fairly low cost. The question then becomes what to do with the data — police commanders are still working on that.